Thursday, July 31, 2008

Raptor for President

Free Image Hosting at www.ImageShack.us

Tuesday, July 29, 2008

McCain wants America to Wear Sunscreen

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/29/us/politics/29mccain.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

SPF 400, and wear lots of it.

I suppose McCain's running mate is more important than him, since McCain might just keel over before he's done being president.

Friday, July 25, 2008

Inscriptions from Pompeii

I've heard a lot about how funny the inscriptions from Pompeii are--here's a couple from a brothel:

http://traumwerk.stanford.edu:3455/SeeingThePast/admin/download.html?attachid=122971

Tuesday, July 15, 2008

How To Always Predict the Future Correctly

1. Never say never: if the assessed event does happen, then the event falsifies the prediction. Yet by saying any possible event could happen, even if it doesn't happen, it still could happen in the future.

2. Never give a deadline: again, if an event hasn't happened yet, it doesn't mean it still can't happen, so the prediction can never be totally wrong, even if it becomes very unlikely.

3. Avoid details: People, places, and deadlines themselves fall into this category. If a prediction states "somebody's gonna get shot," that could be anywhere, any time, any body.

4. If you need to be right soon, make it true no matter what the case: there's ways to word predictions so depending on how they're interpreted, they can always be true. For example, the Oracle at Delphi once gave a prediction to a king who was going to war and wanted the Oracle's advice. The Oracle stated, "if you go to war now, a great empire will fall." So, optimistic, the king went to war, and his great empire fell.

5. Know your shit and state the obvious: If a prediction is based on solid facts, it probably won't go wrong. If a prediction is too obvious, then it will be laughed at, but if it's based on solid--but obscure--facts in a well-established field, then the prediction will come correct and be amazing looking too.

Pointless

This is the stupidest thing ever created.

Innovation is great. Making things new is great. Beating new challenges is great. Virtually taking the wings off an airplane so you can drive a car with two jet engines is such a fucking waste of time, effort, and money. Jets can already go multiples of that speed. The aerodynamics of the thing might be useful--no, never mind, jets already have that technology. Perhaps these things could be used for really fast highways--wait, researchers would just look at the F-14 before they look at this clipped jet plane.

Land speed record--perhaps practical in 1930, absolutely pointless now.
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