Wednesday, August 10, 2005

Fucking Sell-outs

I know someone has probably already written about this. Shoot me.

Everything, in regard to it's popularity, has a rise and fall.
1. Nova - The website/band/company/shitbag/whatever is created, and it is spat out with whatever idea inspired its creation. A few people stumble upon this and like it. The idea was probably thought of without intention for an audience to read or hear or see; it was merely there.

2. Boom - This awesome whatever is spread about by word of mouth. Content may or may not continue to be produced.

3. Peak - Traffic picks up on a massive scale. The author begins to write articles for his or her audience instead of by mere musings.
+ Also, at this point in time, spin-off websites begin to pop-up that try and mimic the format of the popular website. They have nothing good to write and only write for their audience. The product is exceptionally horrible crap; they don't even have the true feeling of the original idea that spawned this whole fiasco.

4. Sell-outs - Traffic increases, but a lot of the original traffic begins to leave. They claim the author has "sold out" and is producing crap. This is probably true, since the new content is designed for the audience and not out of the author's true creative vats.

5. Burn-out - Traffic begins to dwindle, as newer viewers/readers only see the crap behind the website, and not the quality content. Old readers/viewers become bored with the website too, and the whole mess begins to fade. Our hero has to get a McJob now as step off his soap box. The original readers/viewers/listeners will look back in nostalgia; the later audience will forget it existed.

This was in the sense of web blogs, which I despise even though I write one, but can be applied to music, art, periodicals, whatever. Look closer next time. You will know that I am right.

In one aspect, patterns like this are so frequent, that it practically makes the study of history inane. Since the same thing happens over and over again in different ages surrounding different things, there's no need to ask what happened; whatever was destroyed became less popular and no one gave a shit any more. When people resist this pattern, it starts wars and nasty things. And it sucks.

Anyway, for further reading, I read these articles lately, and more than likely this whole article is just my interpretation of those works and my brain sorting them out. Maybe I added something to the whole mess, I dunno.

http://pages.prodigy.net/aesir/tft.htm - This one is about the ever repeating patterns in generations throughout history. Very long, but once you get to the innards of it, it's quite scrumptious.
http://www.shirky.com/writings/powerlaw_weblog.html - This one is about trends of power in blogs and their popularity. It talks about the system as a whole, as opposed to over time (incase anyone wants to think I plagarized).

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